GoatDairyLibrary.org          A database of materials for the commercial goat milk producer
Table of contents 

Bibliography

Building/Planning  A-L

Building/Planning M

Building/Planning N-Z

Conformation  

Conversions

Definitions

Diseases A-B

Diseases C-E

Diseases F-K

Diseases L-O

Diseases P-Q

Diseases R-Z

Diseases Misc.

Forms

Grazing

Medical A-D

Medical E-M

Medical N-R

Medical S-Z

Milk Production  

Nutrition Categories

Nutrition General

Nutrition Grouping

Nutrition Links

Nutrition Rations

Plans

Producers Tips  

Reference

Reproduction 

Seminar Notes

Settng Up

Value Added.

Disease Database- R-Z

Rectal Prolapse

(Source: Haskell, Small Ruminant Clinical Diagnosis and Therapy at p. 282.)

rectal prolapse

Penn State Disease Image Gallery http://www.das.psu.edu/goats/health/gallery/

Causative Agent:  Straining due to coughing from pneumonia, cystitis, a weak anal sphincter, being overweight, feeding uphill, having diarrhea, straining during pregnancy and after lying down for a prolonged period.  It occurs most commonly in kids 6-12 mo. of age, mainly in the summer.  In adults, it most often occurs during birthing, or anytime the animal is straining.

Clinical Signs:   Tissue protruding from rectum.  Poor appetite.

Treatment:  Slaughter the animal, or treat the underlying disease, and then clean the prolapse, use salt or topical lasix to reduce it's size, then give epidural anesthesia and a local lidocaine infusion so you can push the prolapse back in and add sutures to keep it in place.. 

Prevention:  

Contagious To Humans: no

Contagious to Other Goats: no

Links:

Rectal prolapse  http://www.sheepandgoat.com/news/index.html

Rift Valley Fever

(Summarized from )

Causative Agent:

Clinical Signs:  

Treatment:  

Prevention:  

Contagious To Humans:

Contagious to Other Goats: 

Links:

Rift Valley Fever Fact Sheet Fact Sheet http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Factsheets/pdfs/Rift_Valley_Fever.pdf
 
Rift Valley Fever Power Point Slide Show http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/ppt/RiftValleyFever.ppt
 
Rift Valley Fever Speaker's notes http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/notes/RiftValleyFever.pdf
 
Rift Valley Fever Images http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/ImageDB/imagesRVF.htmRiftValley
 
Rift Valley Fever Vaccine http://apps.cfsph.iastate.edu/Vaccines/disease_list.php?diseaseID=54
 
Rift Valley Fever  http://www.oie.int/eng/maladies/fiches/a_A080.htm
 
Rift Valley Fever  http://www.fao.org/ag/againfo/subjects/en/health/diseases-cards/rvf.html

Rinderpest

(Summarized from )

Causative Agent:

Clinical Signs:

Treatment:  

Prevention:

Contagious To Humans:

Contagious to Other Goats: 

Links:

Rinderpest Fact Sheet http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Factsheets/pdfs/Rinderpest.pdf

Rinderpest Power Point Slide Show http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/ppt/Rinderpest.ppt

Rinderpest Speaker's Notes http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/notes/Rinderpest.pdf

Rinderpest Vaccine http://apps.cfsph.iastate.edu/Vaccines/disease_list.php?diseaseID=55

Rinderpest Images http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/ImageDB/imagesRP.htm

Rinderpest   http://www.oie.int/eng/maladies/fiches/a_A040.htm

Ringworm (Dermatophytosis, Dermatomycosis, Tinea)

(Summarized from Smith Goat Medicine at p. 27, Haskell, Small Ruminant Clinical Diagnosis and Therapy, http://www.rmncsba.org/SMALLRUMINANT.pdf at p. 274,  Herd Health management Practices For Goat Production.   Seyedmehdi Mobini, DVM, MS, and Suzanne Gasparotto, Onion Creek Ranch.  http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/
articles2/.skindiseases.html) (The last article is a non-veterinarian article)

Causative Agent: Dermatophytes

Clinical Signs: Bald spots on neck, face, ears, limbs, scrotum, with scaling, redness and crusts.

Treatment: Isolate animal.  Treat with Lime sulphur 2-5% or Iodophor, as total body sprays or daily shampoos, for 5 days, then weekly thereafter. 

Captain 3% is effective, but can’t be used on food animals.  Topical iodine ointment and Thiabendazole paste can be used on small lesions.  Griseofulvin can be used at a dose of 20 mg./kg daily for 1-2 weeks by mouth, but not in food animals.

Homemade treatment:

1 lb. of petrolatum jelly
20 grams of Thiabendazole
15 ml isopropyl alcohol
Liquefy the Vaseline, stir in powder, and add the alcohol. Makes approx. 4% ointment. (Gasparotto)

Prevention: Isolate animals at first sign and keep isolated until completely cured.  Occurs in dark, dirty environment.  Expose to light and sun.  Keep barn clean.

Contagious To Humans: Yes.  Wear gloves.

Contagious to Other Goats: Yes.  Treat any animals that have come into contact with the affected animal.

Links:

Ringworm.  Smith Goat Medicine (1994) at p. 27
 
Ringworm.  Herd Health management Practices For Goat Production.   http://www2.luresext.edu/goats/library/field/herd_health99.htm  Seyedmehdi Mobini, DVM, MS,
 
Dermatophytosis.  Haskell, Small Ruminant Clinical Diagnosis and Therapy, http://www.rmncsba.org/SMALLRUMINANT.pdf at p. 274
 
Ringworm http://www.dlab.colostate.edu/webdocs/ext_vet/cleon15.html
 
Dermatophytosis http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Factsheets/pdfs/dermatophytosis.pdf
 
Dermatophytosis Images http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/ImageDB/imagesDRM.htm
 

Scours (See Coccidiosis or Diarrhea)

Scrapie

(Summarized from )

Causative Agent:  

Clinical Signs:  

Treatment:  

Prevention: 

Contagious To Humans:

Contagious to Other Goats: 

Links:

Scrapie in goats http://www.sheepandgoat.com/news/apr2005.html
 
National Scrapie Education Initiative www.animalagriculture.org
 
Scrapie tags in Wisconsin (608) 270-4000. come with applicator, boxes of 100.  No charge.
 
Scrapie http://cahfs.ucdavis.edu/disease_pdfs/aphisscrapie.pdf
 
Scrapie persists in environment http://mdsheepgoat.blogspot.com

Selenium Deficiency (See White Muscle Disease)

Skin cancer (see Cutaneous neoplasias)

Squamous Cell Carcinoma (see Cutaneous neoplasias)

Soremouth (see Contagious Ecthyma)

Streptothricosis  (See Dermtophilosis)

Tetanus (lockjaw)  

(Summarized from Herd Health management Practices For Goat Production.   Seyedmehdi Mobini, DVM, MS)

Causative Agent: clostridium

Clinical Signs: muscular rigidity, convulsions, abnormal sensitivity to touch, pain, or other sensory stimuli. Once animal goes down, death occurs in 24-36 hours.  

In kids, seen within 4 days of disbudding.  Also after castration.  Seen in adult doe several months after a difficult birth. Also seen with injuries or surgical procedures..

Treatment: Treatment is very expensive and may not work: (High doses of antibiotics, high doses of tetanus antitoxins, wound therapy, fluids and IVs).

Prevention: Readily prevented with cleanliness and vaccination.  Kids: use vaccines at disbudding and castration 150-250 units of tetanus antitoxin.  Adults: use 500-750 units of tetanus antitoxin after being wounded, having a difficult delivery or after surgical procedures.

Contagious To Humans: Yes.

Contagious to Other Goats: Yes.

Links:

Urinary Calculi (see Urithroliasis)

Urolithiasis (urinary calculi)  

(Summarized from Herd Health management Practices For Goat Production.   Seyedmehdi Mobini, DVM, MS)

Causative Agent: Caused from decreased water intake or loss, small urethra, calculi blocking urethra.  Young, castrated males on grain are particularly affected.

Clinical Signs: Restlessness, anxiety, tail twitching, excessive vocalization, straining to urinate, rectal prolapse.  Sometimes you'll see crystals or bloody urine.  Bladder can rupture in 24-48 hours.  After that, fluid fills the genital region.  Death will follow. Get help early on.

Treatment:  Vet needs to treat.  May need surgery.

Prevention:   Dietary management.  Continuous supply of clean water.  Increase salt to 4% of buck ration and ammonium chloride to 1-2% of ration. Herd Health Management Practices For Goat Production.   Seyedmehdi Mobini, DVM, MS)

"...when feeding a predominately high grain diet, a continuous administration of ammonium chloride at a dose of 10 grams per day or at a level of 2% in the concentrate ration has been recommended. Ammonium sulfate is sometimes used at the rate of 0.6-0.7% of the total ration." Dr. Lionel Dawson at (405) 744-8580 or at dlionel@okstate.edu,  Article printed in http://www.luresext.edu/goats/library/newsletter/summer01.htm, accessed 2-12-08.

Contagious To Humans: No

Contagious to Other Goats: No 

Links:  http://www.luresext.edu/goats/library/newsletter/summer01.htm     

Uterine Prolapse  

(Summarized from Herd Health management Practices For Goat Production.   Seyedmehdi Mobini, DVM, MS)

 uterine prolapseuterine prolapse closeup   Penn State Disease Image Gallery http://www.das.psu.edu/goats/health/gallery/

Uterine Prolapse       Closeup view

Causative Agent: Anything that causes prolonged straining, such as chronic coughing or diarrhea.

Clinical Signs: Rectum protrudes outside the body.  It is bright pink in early stages.  If untreated can lead to prolapse of entire intestinal tract and death from shock.

Treatment: Slaughter is recommended.  Valuable animals can be treated by amputating exposed tissue, but the goat should not be used for breeding. 

Prevention: Early treatment of conditions that might cause the animal to strain.

Contagious To Humans: no

Contagious to Other Goats: no

Links:

Warts (see cutaneous neoplasias)

West Nile Fever (West Nile Virus)

(Summarized from  )

Causative Agent:  

Clinical Signs:  

Treatment:  

Prevention:  

Contagious To Humans:

Contagious to Other Goats: 

Links:

West Nile Fever Power Point Slide Show www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/ppt/WestNile.ppt

West Nile Fever Speakers Notes http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/diseaseinfo/notes/WestNileFever.pdf

White Liver Disease (see Cobalt Deficiency)

White Muscle Disease (Selenium deficiency)

(Summarized from )

Causative Agent:  

Clinical Signs:  

Treatment:  

Prevention:  

Contagious To Humans:

Contagious to Other Goats: 

Links:

White Muscle Disease  http://www.sheepandgoat.com/news/feb2004.html#WMD and http://www.sheepandgoat.com/articles/WMD.html.

Copper and Selenium Deficiency http://cahfs.ucdavis.edu/disease_pdfs/copperselenium.pdfl

Zinc Deficiency

(Summarized from Herd Health management Practices For Goat Production. Seyedmehdi Mobini, DVM, MS, and Goat Medicine, Smith and Sherman (1994) p. 104.)

Causative Agent:   Deficiency of zinc

Clinical Signs:  Weight loss.  Bald patches, itching, a thick crust on the back of the leg, face and ears, dandruff, stiff joints, hoof deformities, and small testes, reduced libido (sex drive).  Appears very similar to ringworm.  Diagnosed by skin biopsy.

Treatment:  Give 250 mg. zinc sulfate by mouth, daily for 4 weeks (*3) 

Prevention: Add mineral mix to the daily ration, and put mineral feeders in each pen.

Contagious To Humans: no

Contagious to Other Goats: no

Links:

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